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  Saab Seaeye - Manufacturer of electric powered ROV systems
• FLYING SUBMARINE ENVISAGED BY SAAB SEAEYE ENGINEER
  06 October 2017
• FEMALE AMERICAN STUDENTS EXPLORE FUTURE OF ROBOTICS
  02 October 2017
• FEMALE AMERICAN STUDENTS EXPLORE FUTURE OF ROBOTICS
  11 September 2017
• HOUSTON SEES SAAB SEAEYE EXPAND
  04 September 2017
• SAAB SEAEYE JOINS WITH NOC MARINE ROBOTICS INNOVATION CENTRE
  01 September 2017
• AUSTRALIAN SALMON FARMING GETS NEW FALCON TECHNOLOGY
  17 August 2017
• IMAGINATIVE DIVE WORKS WINS BIG SAVINGS WITH LEOPARD
  30 June 2017
• ROYAL MOROCCAN GENDARMERIE PICKS FALCON FOR EMERGENCIES
  16 June 2017
• LITTLE MOTHERSHIP SOLVES BIG DECOMMISSIONING PROBLEM
  31 May 2017
• GULF OF MEXICO A BLAST FOR FALCON
  19 May 2017
• COUGAR CUTS COSTS IN CANADA
  13 April 2017
• SCIENTISTS DISCOVER ELECTRIC LEOPARD
  30 March 2017
• NORWAY'S AQUACULTURE GETS TOP‐RATED FALCON
  20 March 2017
• SAAB SEAEYE INVESTING IN ENGINEERS
  24 February 2017
• FALCON MODERN ICON
  20 February 2017
• FALCON EVEN SMARTER
  11 February 2017
• SAAB SEAEYE SEE AN ALL-ELECTRIC FUTURE
  14 January 2017
• STUDENTS FLY FALCON FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
  10 January 2017

What's New At Saab Seaeye (2017)
 

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06 October 2017

FLYING SUBMARINE ENVISAGED BY SAAB SEAEYE ENGINEER

A futuristic flying fish-styled defence system for the Royal Navy, was envisaged by Saab Seaeye systems engineer, Ali Roy.

With defence dangers acute at the waterline, she designed an organic shaped concept with the nimble agility to both fly and swim - to avoid detection or pursue a quarry.

click image to enlarge
A futuristic flying fish-styled defence system for the Royal Navy

Joining a team of the UK's brightest and most talented young engineers and scientists Ali was tasked by the Royal Navy, along with the rest of the group, to imagine submarines of the future.

The young British scientists and engineers were gathered together under FutureNest, an offset of UKNEST, a not-for-profit forum that promotes the engineering, science and technology interests of UK Naval Defence.

click image to enlarge
The futuristic submarine

Through an interactive partnership with the best minds in UK Industry and academia the Royal Navy aims to remain a leading global maritime force.

The futuristic submarine concepts, that emerged from the FutureNest group and unveiled by the Royal Navy, mimicked living marine lifeforms and radically changes the way underwater warfare could look in 50 years.

Along with Ali Roy's flying concept, there was a crewed mothership shaped like a manta ray, unmanned eel-like vessels equipped with sensor pods which dissolve on demand to avoid enemy detection, and fish-shaped torpedoes sent to swarm against enemy targets.

Commander Peter Pipkin, the Royal Navy's Fleet Robotics Officer, said: "With more than 70 per cent of the planet's surface covered by water, the oceans remain one of the world's great mysteries and untapped resources.

"It's predicted that in 50 years' time there will be more competition between nations to live and work at sea or under it. So it's with this in mind that the Royal Navy is looking at its future role, and how it will be best equipped to protect Britain's interests around the globe."

Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin said: "These remarkable designs display the great promise of our young engineers and scientists and the great ambition of the Royal Navy.

"This kind of innovation is at the heart of defence and the UK's world-leading capability. That's why we are using our rising budget to invest in high-tech capability to keep our Armed Forces at the cutting-edge, and our 800 million Innovation Fund aims to take advantage of exactly these kinds of futuristic ideas."

click image to enlarge
Secretary of State, Michael Fallon, and Ali Roy from Saab Seaeye (centre) along with some of the young scientists and engineers from FutureNest.
Secretary of State, Michael Fallon, and Ali Roy from Saab Seaeye (centre) along with some of the young scientists and engineers from FutureNest.

Secretary of State Michael Fallon said that the ideas proposed were the most important he had seen.

When the Royal Navy were asked about the biggest technological constraints they faced, they declared that there are two major technological hurdles to overcome.

Firstly, the sea is still the best place on the planet to hide and submarines will continue to be the ultimate stealth weapons of war.

Second, it is still tough to communicate underwater in terms of range and bandwidth. A lot of work is being done on this area, and the RN continues to be world leaders in this research and is looking at the commercial sector to help solve these problems.

The Navy point out that the inventor of the modern submarine, John Philip Holland, was inspired by the Jules Verne science fiction novel "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" published in 1870. And technology used in Star Trek 30 years ago is now embedded into our phones and watches.

Ali Roy's contribution was acknowledged by Saab's director of business development and strategy, Bo Rydell who sent his congratulations and thanks to her for her commitment to the underwater world.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


02 October 2017

TIGERS CLEAR NUCLEAR WASTE

click image to enlarge
Legacy ponds at Sellafield
Legacy ponds at Sellafield

Two Saab Seaeye Tiger robotic vehicles are to work in the radioactive ponds at the Sellafield nuclear site.

They were chosen because their proven thruster reliability is vitally important in a highly corrosive environment where maintenance intervention is hazardous to humans.

"Reliability is key for the health of operators," explains Phil Toomey, Technical Manager at Sellafield Ltd. "They must wash down the Tigers during maintenance checks as exposure to radiation for operators is carefully limited, so unplanned downtime will quickly exhaust their safe working period in any one year."

Sellafield Ltd intends the Tigers to work continuously for six months at a time between scheduled maintenance periods.

The Tiger's thruster working life of 10,000 hours was a major appeal. Phil Toomey describes how the Tiger's role is to help clean up and empty the legacy storage ponds by picking up and sorting nuclear material, including radioactive fuel bars. The nuclear waste can often be buried in about 30 cms of sludge, which is also highly radioactive and hazardous.

Each fuel bar is around one metre long, weighs 15 kilos and is gripped in the middle by the Tiger's under-slung manipulator, monitored and identified, then transferred to a skip which can be removed from the pond for safer storage in a more modern facility.

click image to enlarge
Tiger with under-slung manipulator skid
 

In addition to the under-slung manipulator skid, a four-function forward facing manipulator skid is available, together with an under-slung water-jet cleaning skid. Also on board the Tigers are a colour zoom camera and a down and rear view camera.

"We wanted a proven robotic vehicle," says Phil Toomey, "and we also liked that the Tiger's skid technology makes it easy to swap skids."

Sellafield Ltd was influenced in its choice of the Tiger by evidence of its extensive field work in hostile underwater environments around the world.

Tigers mark a new era of functionality and reliability for machines that have become an essential part of the nuclear waste retrievals toolbox.

click image to enlarge
Water-jet skid
Tiger with under-slung manipulator skid   Water-jet skid

Rob Smith, Retrievals Manager for Legacy Ponds, said: "It's a shift into a 'production line mentality' for waste retrievals. These machines will be at the nuclear coalface for longer than our existing fleet can manage. They will be our new workhorses for hazard and risk reduction."

Sellafield Ltd plans to have removed all bulk fuel and sludge from its legacy ponds by 2022.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Ruth Hutchison
Sellafield Ltd
+44 (0) 1946 786227


11 September 2017

FEMALE AMERICAN STUDENTS EXPLORE FUTURE OF ROBOTICS

Female marine-study students are showing a particular interest in electric underwater robotics says Northwestern Michigan College, the first in America to offer a Bachelor of Science in Maritime Technology.

click image to enlarge
Taking the Falcon offshore allows students to explore the potential of underwater robotic systems in a practical environment.
Taking the Falcon offshore allows students to explore the potential
of underwater robotic systems in a practical environment.

This chimes with studies by America's National Science Foundation who report that more women are becoming involved in all areas of water science.

Saab Seaeye, makers of the college's new Falcon robotic vehicle, agrees. They too find increased interest in women wanting to follow a career in electric underwater robotics.

click image to enlarge
Ali Roy, Systems Engineer at Saab Seaeye, standing alongside another much larger robotic vehicle she helped design: the Leopard - the most powerful of its class in the world.
Ali Roy, Systems Engineer at Saab Seaeye, standing alongside
another much larger robotic vehicle she helped design:
the Leopard - the most powerful of its class in the world.


Ali Roy is a systems engineer at Saab Seaeye where many female engineers and technicians work in departments throughout the company.

"We also have an increasing number of female students coming to us for work experience," she says. "It's gratifying to see young female engineers excelling here at Seaeye, and as a designer it's great that the college is using our robotic system to teach a new generation of female marine professionals."

Hans VanSumeren, Director of the Great Lakes Water Studies Institute at the college has found that female students have a growing interest in the underwater world with a particular enthusiasm for underwater robotics.


"Our female students have a keen interest in the expanding role of electric underwater robotics and the Falcon has been a vital element of their studies," he declares.

click image to enlarge
Students get first hand experience piloting the Falcon under International Marine Contractors Association guidelines.
Students get first hand experience
piloting the Falcon under International
Marine Contractors Association guidelines.

Students involved in marine studies come from universities and colleges across America for the opportunity to interact with the real underwater world - including operating the Saab Seaeye Falcon underwater robotic vehicle.

Their course covers the calibration, deployment, operation, maintenance, and management of marine technology assets, including data collection, processing and mapping.

Part of the course involves examining shipwrecks at depths of around 150 metres whilst operating the Falcon which is fitted with an advanced sonar system to help students study underwater robotics as a multicomponent resource used across a wide range of subsea activities.

Having such an advanced sonar system enables students to experience a range of imaging and profiling data collection options that include bathymetric measurement, seafloor imaging, obstacle avoidance, structural inspection and vessel hull inspection.

Students benefit from first-hand experience by piloting the Falcon under International Marine Contractors Association guidelines.

click image to enlarge
Falcon is at the leading edge of Huon's developments in advancing the use of technology in aquaculture.
 
click image to enlarge
The College has two research vessels from which students can deploy the Falcon in support of their studies and research projects.
The College has two research vessels from which
students can deploy the Falcon in support of their
studies and research projects.
Both practical and operational management
experience is offered by the course.

Hans VanSumeren chose the Falcon because, "It is highly reliable and never breaks down," and says the Falcon is, "the most widely used ROV in the industry and therefore the one students are most likely to come across in their working life."

The Bachelor of Science in Maritime Technology at Northwestern Michigan College provides an interdisciplinary education in targeted areas of marine technology. The curriculum is a blend of several technical competencies common to the marine industry.

click image to enlarge
Northwestern Michigan College has it own large docking facility - which can be used for dockside launching of the Falcon.
Northwestern Michigan College has it own large docking facility
- which can be used for dockside launching of the Falcon.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


04 September 2017

HOUSTON SEES SAAB SEAEYE EXPAND

The world's largest manufacturer of e-robotic underwater systems, Saab Seaeye is further expanding its operations in Houston, USA.

This comes as interest grows in the region for Saab Seaeye's advanced smart robotic systems.

Offshore operators and other users of underwater vehicles are seeing considerable savings coming from Saab Seaeye's latest innovative robotic technology.

Miniaturisation and other technological developments make the new generation of vehicles smaller and more powerful, with intelligent control systems. They are ready and able to undertake a wide range of tasks whilst mastering turbulent waters such as the strong Gulf Loop Current - and stay on task much longer than other systems.

Chris Roper, North America Sales Manager, Commercial Underwater Systems Saab Seaeye
Chris Roper
North America Sales Manager

Commercial Underwater Systems Saab Seaeye

Operators report that the smaller size and lower overall cost of the company's work system is bringing savings of up to 40% over comparable hydraulic systems.

Houston-based sales manager, Chris Roper, says growing interest has led the company to expand their operations to include engineering support ready to provide a strong local resource for the growing number of systems and customers in the region.


Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Chris Roper
Saab North America Inc
001 (713) 993 7733

www.seaeye.com


SAAB SEAEYE JOINS WITH NOC MARINE ROBOTICS INNOVATION CENTRE

01 September 2017

SAAB SEAEYE JOINS WITH NOC MARINE ROBOTICS INNOVATION CENTRE

World leading underwater robotics company, Saab Seaeye, has joined the National Oceanography Centre's (NOC) Marine Robotics Innovation Centre, as an Associate Member.

Since its foundation in 1986, Saab Seaeye has pioneered many innovations that have revolutionised the underwater systems industry and helped establish its lead position in the world of electric underwater robotics

For Saab Seaeye, the NOC is an important hub in the development of underwater autonomous and robotic systems, and this new membership will further enable Saab Seaeye to collaborate with other strategic partners in the advancement of underwater robotic systems.

Jon Robertson, Managing Director at Saab Seaeye said "Our association with the NOC will allow us to advance the emergence of transformative robotics by continuing to integrate AUV and ROV technologies into electric robotic systems that are smaller, lighter, smarter and more versatile than current operational vehicles."

Driving the rise of transformative systems is the advancement of intelligent, behaviour-based control systems architecture, such as Saab Seaeye's iCON. This concept comprises hardware and software building blocks that allow the rapid and harmonious migration of options across different systems, resulting in accelerated development and innovation.

Adam Schink, Marine Robotics Innovation Centre Manager at the NOC added,
"The concept of transformative technology is already creating a future where readily adaptable systems are able to resolve varied and complex tasks at a much lower cost than ever before. We are delighted to welcome Saab Seaeye to the Innovation Centre - forging links with industry and academia is vital in expanding these frontiers of science and technology."

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) is the UK's leading institution for integrated coastal and deep ocean research. NOC undertakes and facilitates world-class agenda-setting scientific research to understand the global ocean by solving challenging multidisciplinary, large scale, long-term marine science problems to underpin international and UK public policy, business and wider society outcomes.

NOC operates the Royal Research Ships James Cook and Discovery and develops technology for coastal and deep ocean research. Working with its partners, NOC provides long-term marine science capability including: sustained ocean observing, mapping and surveying; data management and scientific advice.

The National Oceanography Centre is wholly owned by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Dr Leigh Marsh
National Oceanography Centre
+44 (0) 23 8059 6170

www.noc.ac.uk


17 August 2017

AUSTRALIAN SALMON FARMING GETS NEW FALCON TECHNOLOGY

The largest majority privately owned producer of fresh salmon in Australia, Huon Aquaculture, has ordered a second Saab Seaeye Falcon underwater e-robotic vehicle.

Their newest Falcon is now enhanced with Saab Seaeye's iCON behaviour-based intelligent control architecture.

This is an important new resource for Huon as iCON makes possible the option of intelligent station-keeping and precise positioning that helps reduce operator workload by allowing them to concentrate on the task in hand.

Huon's main use of the Falcons is to inspect the nets, rigging and moorings in their aquaculture pens.

"The key reason we decided to purchase a second Falcon is its reliability and Saab Seaeye's excellent after sales support," says Huon's business development manager, James Bender.

Shea Cameron, Huon's subsea manager adds that the first Falcon has worked tirelessly for 1000s of hours. "We like the low height of the machine because we can deploy it sideways between a walkway and the net," he says. "The SIMCT thrusters are also ideal for aquaculture use with no shaft seals to service or inspect. None of the other machines we own at the moment have this advantage. We also like the ease of servicing the machine so feel comfortable ordering a new one with iCON that is compatible with our current machine."

Introducing advanced underwater robotic vehicle systems to their aquaculture operation aligns with Huon's continued introduction of new technologies and developments at their three locations, including adding well-boats and larger pens.

  
The key reason we decided to purchase a
second Falcon is its reliability and Saab
Seaeye's excellent after sales support

James Bender
Business Development Manager, Huon

The Falcon will help Huon continue leading the way in environmental and business standards, says the company, which was founded in 1986 and prides itself on being first to take the process from whole fresh fish to smoked packaged product as well as creating some of the freshest salmon products in the world.

By picking the Falcon concept, Huon has chosen the most popular vehicle of its class in the world with a success record in the global aquaculture sector for over 12 years.

For aquaculture work, the Falcon's winning design has the power and manoeuvrability to operate with precision amongst large and deep nets and in strong crosscurrents.

The design also allows a wide range of equipment for many different tasks to be easily added and changed on a system that is simple and easy to operate.

The Falcon's global success comes from having packed five powerful thrusters and an intelligent distributed control system in a compact 1 x 0.5 x 0.6 metre versatile system that has been proven worldwide since 2002.

Falcon is at the leading edge of Huon's developments in advancing the use of technology in aquaculture.   Falcon is at the leading edge of Huon's developments in advancing the use of technology in aquaculture.
Falcon is at the leading edge of Huon's developments in advancing the use of technology in aquaculture.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

Huon Aquaculture, founded in 1986 is the largest privately owned producer of salmon in Australia and a leader in environmental and business standards aimed at creating the freshest salmon products in the world.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

James Bender
Huon Aquaculture Group Ltd
+ 61 (0) 3 6295 8111

www.huonaqua.com.au


30 June 2017

IMAGINATIVE DIVE WORKS WINS BIG SAVINGS WITH LEOPARD

Unprecedented savings have been won by Australia's innovative subsea services company, Dive Works, for their oil and gas clients through the imaginative deployment of their Saab Seaeye Leopard electric robotic vehicle.

The Saab Seaeye Leopard performed seemingly impossible IRM work scope in Bass Strait, says Dive Works, which previously could only be achieved by large and expensive hydraulic systems and divers.

Andrew Ford and his crew preparing the lift bag ready to be manoeuvred by the Leopard inside a platform structure with the Diamond Wire Cutting Saw.  
Andrew Ford and his crew preparing the lift bag
ready to be manoeuvred by the Leopard inside a
platform structure with the Diamond Wire Cutting Saw.
  Diamond Wire Cutting Saw in action.  
Diamond Wire Cutting Saw in action.

Millions of dollars were saved for their client, says Dive Works, by utilising the Leopard's size, power, agility and manoeuvrability to its best advantage.

It was their innovative adaptation of the Leopard to perform the complex task that made a quick and cost effective solution possible, suggests the company.

Saab Seaeye says Dive Works is showing the world how big savings can be made in the oil and gas industry from technological advances in electric underwater robotics, as smaller, smarter and more powerful vehicles are adapted to undertake much larger tasks.

Dive Works' managing director Andrew Ford applauds the Saab Seaeye Leopard's overall design: "Our Leopard has completed over 750 dives, it is the most powerful ROV of its size in the world and we continue to maximise its capacity in extreme conditions and on extreme tasks with on-going success."

Owning and operating such a powerful, smart-sized system has allowed Dive Works to employ a new 34m, specialist, high speed, smaller-than-usual support vessel, that is custom-configured and ideal for emergency response.

"We now have a vessel with a speed of 19 knots which can be mobilised and reach a job 400 miles away within 24 hours - and go places big vessels can't go. We can access ports nearer the work site, move closer inshore and get closer to the job - and a speedy vessel means we can stay out longer, thus extending the weather window and saving the client money," says Andrew Ford.

Dive Works has also successfully installed a live video feed from their Leopard where clients can log on from anywhere in the world and view the work being done subsea. This advanced technical application allows clients to make real time decisions, which saves significant time and money.

There is a lot to like about the Saab Seaeye Leopard, Andrew Ford says. "The 30 tonne complete package has a much smaller footprint, faster mobilisation time, lower maintenance costs, and needs far fewer staff at the worksite."

He goes on to list the tasks successfully completed by the Leopard:

  • Penetrated deep inside a complex platform structure to perform heavy-duty repair work and deploy underwater rigging to locations larger vehicles could not access.
  • Performed a 490 km long PNG pipeline survey fitted with camera booms and wheeled skid.
  • Operated a crawler to inspect welds on a number of platforms in extremely shallow water.
  • Worked a 36,000psi water blaster for cleaning platform legs to bright metal.
  • Inspected platform risers whilst handling 200 kilos of sensor equipment.

Important for Andrew Ford is the Leopard's ability to maintain a stable work platform whilst working with heavy tooling in adverse conditions - made possible by its iCON intelligent control architecture and 11 powerful thrusters.

"For a vehicle of its size, I also like the iCON intelligent control architecture that allows even more interchangeable tooling and survey sensors to be installed," said Andrew Ford.

Complete Leopard package aboard Dive Works' chartered, fast, long-range, low-draft support and emergency response vessel.  
Complete Leopard package aboard Dive Works' chartered, fast,
long-range, low-draft support and emergency response vessel.
  Leopard caged in its TMS.  
Leopard caged in its TMS.

This is helped by the Leopard's new large open payload bay that allows for ample systems to be installed on sliding trays for rapid reconfiguration and easy maintenance.

Should the Leopard suffer multiple equipment damage, it has a chance of remaining on task, as iCON allows the vehicle to 'think for itself' and independently manage each intelligent device on the vehicle to create a state of auto redundancy.

On a regular basis, the Leopard's state of health can be monitored through remote diagnostics to anywhere onshore.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

Dive Works is an Australian based commercial diving and ROV services company, specialising in innovative subsea solutions to the oil and gas industry, government and water authorities, and the marine and aquaculture industries.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Andrew Ford
Dive Works
+ 61 408 881 616

www.diveworks.com.au


16 June 2017

ROYAL MOROCCAN GENDARMERIE PICKS FALCON FOR EMERGENCIES

click image to enlarge
ROYAL MOROCCAN GENDARMERIE PICKS FALCON FOR EMERGENCIES

For their search, rescue and recovery operations The Royal Moroccan Gendarmerie has chosen a Saab Seaeye Falcon underwater robotic vehicle.

They choose the Falcon as a small, yet powerful resource for rapid deployment from a small boat or RIB and which can accommodate an array of search and recovery systems.

Its proven virtues have appealed to other emergency and law enforcement services around the world, including operating reliably in some of the most demanding environments on the planet, from extreme heat to under ice, and from deep tunnel investigations to overcoming strong currents and tides.

The Falcon will be deployed along Morocco's 2000 km coastline and in the country's many inland lakes.

The Gendarmerie liked that in strong currents the Falcon can manoeuvre with precision and remain steady on task, whilst also fitted with a variety of tooling, cameras and sonar equipment.

They particularly like that that it can work in confined spaces, in darkness and tirelessly for hours at a time.

This capability comes from having five powerful thrusters and an intelligent distributed control system that helps maintain stability in turbulent waters.

Rapid mission change

The distributed control system allows equipment to be changed rapidly for different missions

The equipment provided for the Falcon was arranged by Saab Seaeye's Spanish distributor, Casco Antiguo, and includes: high definition video camera, scanning sonar, MicronNav system for tracking in very shallow water, a sample scoop, five-function manipulator and rope cutter.

click image to enlarge
The equipment provided for the Falcon was arranged by Saab Seaeye's Spanish distributor, Casco Antiguo.


The Gendarmerie also appreciate that their Falcon can go places too hazardous for diving operations and where the depth of water and strength of current are too dangerous for divers to operate.

But when divers are necessary, hazardous searches can be avoided and dive time reduced by first sending down the Falcon with its camera and high intensity lights to pinpoint what the diver cannot see and direct them to the location of interest.


Once the diver is at work, the Falcon can keep a watchful eye over them for added safety, along with saving dive time by transporting tools back and forth.

The unique character of the Falcon, that measures just 1 x 0.5 x 0.6 metres, has made it the most successful robotic vehicle of its size in the world since its launch over 15 years ago.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


31 May 2017

LITTLE MOTHERSHIP SOLVES BIG DECOMMISSIONING PROBLEM

An ingenious idea from Saab Seaeye customer, Stinger Technology, has found a way to penetrate the labyrinth inside offshore production tanks in search of environmental contaminates prior to decommissioning.

They managed to squeeze a unique underwater robotic systems configuration loaded with sampling technology through a 150 cm square hatch to search the tank's internal maze of baffles, and navigate along 25.5 cm diameter pipe-runs of curves and bends.

Stinger's idea turned the already compact Saab Seaeye Falcon into a 'mother ship' from which is launched an even smaller fly-out VideoRay and tiny fly-out Stinger Nano.

The Norwegian company dubbed the trio, Mother, Daughter and Little Sister.

click image to enlarge
The full mother, daughter and little sister configuration comprising:

Saab Seaeye Falcon
VideoRay Pro4
Stinger Nano Fly-out TMS with 120m tether
Docking station
Subsea toolbox
Tailor-made interchangeable tools
Docking cleaning device in tool basket


With the market expecting 1800 wells to be decommissioned over the next 10 years, in Norway and the UK alone, the new 'little family' is set to be busy.

Importantly for offshore operators, is that sampling investigations on installations still in production, but planned for decommissioning, are not interrupted.

Saab Seaeye were pleased to collaborate with Stinger who are known for finding innovative ways to work in confined underwater spaces and chose the Falcon as the smallest and most powerful option on the market.

The Falcon's five-thruster strong precise manoeuvrability, and the plug and play configurability of its intelligent distributed control system, meant Stinger were confident it would be an ideal mothership for the two fly-off resources.

Measuring just 1 x 0.5 x 0.6 metres in size, Stinger knew the Falcon could pass through the 150cm hatch and into the 'nose tank', even when fully configured, ready for launching the daughter and sister from their integrated tether management system on their extended sampling missions.

click image to enlarge
Saab Seaeye Falcon, loaded with the VideoRay and showing the docking station and under-slung tether management system
Saab Seaeye Falcon, loaded with the VideoRay and showing the docking station
and under-slung tether management system
click image to enlarge
VideoRay fitted with one of the various sampling tools developed by Stinger  
VideoRay fitted with one of the various
sampling tools developed by Stinger
  click image to enlarge
Stinger Nano, developed as the smallest and most powerful plug-in fly-away, can include HD camera, still and video and is depth rated to 500m  
Stinger Nano, developed as the smallest and most powerful plug-in fly-away, can include HD camera, still and video and is depth rated to 500m
click image to enlarge
Tank layout showing entrance for mothership  
Tank layout showing entrance for mothership
  click image to enlarge
Fly-out systems from the Falcon had to negotiate various 25.5cm pipe runs  
Fly-out systems from the Falcon had to negotiate various 25.5cm pipe runs

The entire Falcon mother ship configuration, with its fly-out 120m TMS, its docking station for fly-out daughter and sister, a subsea toolbox, tailor-made subsea interchangeable tools using manipulator, and docking-inclusive cleaning device in its tool basket - all fitted into a total system dimension of 1000x1000x850mm.

Saab Seaeye engineers were keen to assist in Stinger's technological achievement, which included Stinger developing their own miniature robotic system in the form of the Nano - the smallest and most advanced plugin fly-out on the market.

Once into the tank and embarking upon the data-gathering mission, two operators work in tandem - one, piloting the Falcon, the other piloting the daughter and sister.

The environmental sampling strategy involved seeking out various residues expected within the tank from a lifetime of production cycles. These included oil, oil and water emulsion, wax, scale, sediment and sludge, sand, and possibly smaller gas pockets.

The VideoRay and Stinger Nano were fitted out with a range of tools including a deposit depth rule tool for measuring sediment and deposits on base and walls, a scraper tool for measuring the thin layer of hydrocarbon wax deposits on the tank wall and a scoop sampler. Included was a water quality sensor for measuring dissolved oxygen, temperature, conductivity, salinity, specific conductance, resistivity, pH and ORP. A bottle sampler with a manipulator operated release mechanism was also included and a camera to verify successful sample taking.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e-robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

Stinger Technology specialise in finding tailored solutions to problems posed by working in confined spaces. As systems integrators they create a product or service from design to implementation.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Bjarte Langeland
Stinger Technology AS
+47 5297 3245

www.stinger.no


19 May 2017

GULF OF MEXICO A BLAST FOR FALCON

Cavitation blasting 68 intake screens in six days at a drill ship, whilst working in eight-foot waves and 2.5 knot currents using the small Saab Seaeye Falcon, won a competitive advantage for Inquest Services in the Gulf of Mexico.

Despite its diminutive one metre size the Falcon held steady and stable against the 3000psi force of the CaviBlaster, a feat achieved by the Falcon's intelligent control system and its five powerful thrusters - a design concept from Saab Seaeye that has made it a worldwide success.

"Using the Falcon was a sophisticated solution that gave us a competitive advantage over commercial divers," declares Chris Walker, dive supervisor at Inquest, who undertake both diving and ROV services. "The Falcon was faster, safer and kept working for as long as needed."

He describes how they removed up to three inches of hard growth on the 68 screens during the six days and up to two inches of soft growth in the vessel's moonpool.

click image to enlarge
Intake screen - before  
Intake screen - before
  click image to enlarge
Intake screen - after  
Intake screen - after

Another saving for the customer, explains Chris Walker, came from inspecting and cleaning the ship's thrusters, as only the thruster the Falcon was working on needed to be shut down, rather than having to stop all thrusters in the quadrant, necessary for safety when work is undertaken by a diver.

His customers also liked that the extremely small footprint of the Falcon system had no impact on other operations on board the ship.

Prior to the start of the cleaning operation, Inquest sent the Falcon to visually examine the drill ship's lower hull and side shell, along with the moonpool inside the vessel.

For the cleaning mission, Inquest created a modified tray to house the CaviBlaster on board the Falcon in a complex but effective configuration, says Chris Walker.

He says the Falcon was the ideal choice for the undertaking:

"We needed a more sophisticated and effective solution to compete with commercial divers, which is why we chose the Falcon.

"There are lots of ROVs on the market but both Saab Seaeye and Falcon have a good track record.

"The Falcon has proven reliability and a simple plug and play intelligent control system that makes configuration easy - and it can perform a large assortment of tasks whilst maintaining stability in turbulent waters and strong currents."

click image to enlarge
The Falcon can go places too dangerous for diving operations.
The Falcon can go places too dangerous for diving operations.

The unique character of the Falcon, that measures just 1 x 0.5 x 0.6 metres, has made it the most successful electric underwater robotic vehicle of its size in the world since its launch over 15 years ago.

Inquest is an independent marine asset management company that offers survey, inspection and repair solutions for the energy sector.

In their role, that also provides diving services, they see the Falcon going places too hazardous for diving operations and where the depth of water and strength of current are too dangerous for divers to operate.

But when divers are necessary dive time can be reduced by sending the Falcon down first to pinpoint the location of interest and, once the diver is at work, the Falcon can keep a watchful eye for added safety, along with saving dive time by transporting tools back and forth.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

Inquest Services is an independent marine asset management company, specialising in integrity management, compliance, remediation, and preservation support for the offshore drilling industry. They also offer in house rope access and commercial diving services.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Chris Walker
Inquest Services
+ 1 281 579 6200

www.inquest-services.com


13 April 2017

COUGAR CUTS COSTS IN CANADA

Dominion Diving made big cost savings by customising their Saab Seaeye Cougar XT light work electric robotic vehicle and boosting its performance.

The resulting Cougar XT custom version could handle a tooling package normally possible only on a much larger hydraulic system - and take on three demanding tasks in one hit.

click image to enlarge
The Cougar XT custom version, in Dominion Diving livery, complete with its three-fold 100hp equivalent tooling package.
The Cougar XT custom version, in Dominion Diving livery,
complete with its three-fold 100hp equivalent tooling package.

Founded 50 years ago, Dominion Diving, based on Canada's Atlantic coast, provide subsea services and have a reputation for finding imaginative ways to fulfil demanding tasks.

Matthew Lohnes, president of Dominion, explains how the Cougar XT's power and design flexibility allowed them to readily enhance and boost the system.

"We effectively turned the Cougar into a work class system that could undertake tasks typically needing 100hp hydraulic tooling and perform three roles in one tooling package."

  We effectively turned the Cougar into a work class system
    Matthew Lohnes
President, Dominion Diving

He explains how the subsea intervention was to profile a manifold site using multibeam sonar; then operate a trash pump to excavate and clear sand and debris from the valve row, before engaging a torque tool to isolate the manifold and then operate a manipulator to turn paddle valves.

"In building the package we added extra channels to control different survey equipment, and built an enlarged skid to accommodate the tooling which included a Kraft Predator seven-function force feedback manipulator and a torque tool."

click image to enlarge
The Cougar XT is a proven compact 2000 metre rated e-robotic system able to handle a variety of task-specific skids with different tooling options that can be easily bolted on and changed as needed.
The Cougar XT is a proven compact 2000
metre rated e-robotic system able to handle a
variety of task-specific skids with different
tooling options that can be easily bolted on
and changed as needed.

Faced with a new one-ton payload, they added an additional thruster to the Cougar XT's six-strong thruster pack.

The result was a very compact system that undertook all three tasks whilst operating successfully in currents of 2.5 knots and working with exceptional manoeuvrability in a confined space.

The Cougar XT is a proven compact 2000 metre rated electric vehicle that is able to handle a variety of task-specific skids with different tooling options that can be easily bolted on and changed as needed.

Matthew Lohnes concluded by stating that the flexibility and performance of the customised Cougar XT meant the job was completed on time and to budget.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

Dominion Diving was founded in 1969 as a small salvage based business operating out of Halifax Harbour. It has grown to become Canada's leading diving, ROV and marine service contractor for the Eastern Canada's offshore oil and gas industry and with a strong presence in the inshore marine construction, ship repair/support, and scientific research industries.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Matthew Lohnes
Dominion Diving Ltd
+1 (902) 434 5120

http://www.dominiondiving.com


30 March 2017

SCIENTISTS DISCOVER ELECTRIC LEOPARD

Marine scientists are discovering that the Leopard electric underwater robotic vehicle from Saab Seaeye is particularly suited for complex and varied research projects.

These projects range from cold‐water coral studies to environmental monitoring, biodiversity research and tsunami warning systems.

click image to enlarge
The 3000m rated Leopard is the most powerful electric underwater e‐robotic system in the world, making it ideal for complex and demanding scientific tasks.
The 3000m rated Leopard is the most powerful electric underwater e‐robotic system
in the world, making it ideal for complex and demanding scientific tasks.

Tokyo University says that technological advances in underwater robotics systems, as found in the Leopard, are making a wider range of tasks more possible.

Studies in Japan are using the Leopard to examine the biodiversity surrounding hydrothermal vent activity in order to protect the inter-connecting ecosystems around mineral extraction sites.

They are also using the Leopard to help enhance the tsunami early warning seismographic monitoring system on the sea floor with the installation of 45 kilometres of new sensors and transponders.

At Israel's University of Haifa, chief engineer, Ben Herzberg, says they chose their 3000m-rated Leopard after evaluating a range of systems from different manufacturers.

"We opted for the Leopard, not just because of its technological excellence and because Saab Seaeye is the largest manufacturer of electric robotic systems in the world, but also because the universities and scientific users we contacted gave Saab Seaeye the best and most positive feedback."

He added that Saab Seaeye had a trusted reputation for robust and reliable systems as well as offering the best service when compared with other ROV manufacturers.

click image to enlarge
The Leopard inside its tether management system, ready for studies offshore Japan.
The Leopard inside its tether management system, ready for studies offshore Japan.
  click image to enlarge
Images and data from the Leopard can be examined by scientists aboard the research vessel. The service boat resources offered by
Abyss Aqua supports aquaculture
and sea work assignments in Norway.

Scientists around the world welcome a resource that is compact enough to fit onto a small research vessel yet has the power of a work vehicle.

Even when loaded with research equipment, the 3000m rated Leopard can maintain unmatched flight stability in strong currents for precise recording and sampling tasks.

Making this possible is the Leopard's advanced iCON distributed control architecture and its 11 powerful thrusters, setting it as the most powerful system of its size in the world.

The Leopard's precise multi-directional maneuverability has allowed scientists to accurately film along straight lines in turbulent high current seas whilst keeping steady to within 10cm of navigational accuracy.

Apart from supreme directional control, scientists particularly like iCON's building-block concept that allows more interchangeable tooling and survey sensors to be installed than ever before possible in a vehicle of the Leopard's size.

In addition to cameras, sensors and manipulators, samples can be gathered and stored in a recovery skid mounted beneath the Leopard where a sample box with several discrete compartments for samples can be opened and closed hydraulically and a two‐line laser on the pan and tilt unit used for size calibration of objects on the seafloor.

When scientists operating in remote locations are faced with the risk of multiple equipment damage, they have a better chance of remaining on task as iCON will independently manage each intelligent device on the vehicle to keep the vehicle working.

In addition, operators get greater information through iCON, making maintenance simpler and providing remote internet access for upgrades and support.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


20 March 2017

NORWAY'S AQUACULTURE GETS TOP‐RATED FALCON

Abyss Aqua, a key provider of services to the Norwegian aquaculture industry, has bought a second Saab Seaeye Falcon, the world's most successful electric underwater robotic system of its class.

click image to enlarge
Abyss Aqua provides diving and ROV services to the aquaculture industry.
Abyss Aqua provides diving and ROV services to the aquaculture industry.

They have added the deeper-rated 1000 metre version of the Falcon to their extensive fleet of underwater vehicles.

"We decided to go for the Falcon DR, not only because of its reliability, but also its price," says ROV manager, Hans Christian Myhre. "We already have one Falcon ROV and we are very pleased with the performance and ease of maintenance."

He explains that the Falcon will support them in the wide range of services they provide for the Norwegian aquaculture industry.

"This includes installing, changing, inspecting and cleaning nets. Also mooring work, towing and transport, along with cleaning and disinfecting fish breeding equipment."

click image to enlarge
For the aquaculture industry the Falcon is a winning concept with the power and precise control to operate around large and deep nets in high currents and carry a wide range of equipment for many different tasks.  
For the aquaculture industry the Falcon is a winning concept with the power and precise control to operate around large and deep nets in high currents and carry a wide range of equipment for many different tasks.
  click image to enlarge
The service boat resources offered by Abyss Aqua supports aquaculture and sea work assignments in Norway.  
The service boat resources offered by
Abyss Aqua supports aquaculture
and sea work assignments in Norway.

The Falcon has been successfully deployed in the aquaculture sector internationally for over 12 years.

Its winning concept comes from having the power and precise control to operate around large and deep nets in high currents.

A wide range of equipment for many different tasks can be easily added and changed and the system is simple and easy to operate.

The Falcon's success comes from having packed five powerful thrusters and an intelligent distributed control system into a small, easily manhandled 1 x 0.5 x 0.6 metre versatile system that has been proven worldwide since 2002.

Abyss Aqua is a member of the Abyss Group, one of Norway's leading inshore subsea corporations. Abyss Aqua specialises in underwater and service boat operations that include ROV and diving work for the aquaculture industry and sea works assignments

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Hans Christian Myhre
Abyss AS
+47 920 12 107

www.abyss.no


24 February 2017

SAAB SEAEYE INVESTING IN ENGINEERS

Investment in new technologies sees Saab Seaeye, the world's largest manufacturer of electric underwater robotic systems, launch a recruitment drive to find software and electrical engineers at all levels, including senior engineering management, for their Fareham, Portsmouth, Head Office and manufacturing base.

With markets in oil and gas, renewables, hydro engineering and marine science, amongst others, Saab Seaeye has been established for over 30 years and has offices in Sweden, America and the UK, and is part of the Saab Group.

Increased investment comes as rapid advances in miniaturisation and control architecture are creating smaller, smarter robotic systems that are more agile, more powerful and are bringing advanced technology and efficiencies to an ever widening range of complex tasks across many different market sectors.

Saab Seaeye says engineers will join a company with a worldwide reputation for pioneering engineering that has long led the industry with cutting edge designs and technologies.

click image to enlarge
Engineers at Saab Seaeye continue to create pioneering electric robotic systems for a wide variety of tasks across many different market sectors. Here, the company's smallest vehicle is seen undertaking scientific research into the ocean's ecosystems at depths of 1000m. Larger systems can operate down to 6000m.

Engineers at Saab Seaeye continue to create pioneering electric robotic systems for a wide variety of tasks across many different market sectors.

Here, the company's smallest vehicle is seen undertaking scientific research into the ocean's ecosystems at depths of 1000m. Larger systems can operate down to 6000m.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


20 February 2017

FALCON MODERN ICON

On permanent display at the Offshore Experience Exhibition in Rotterdam is the most successful underwater robotic vehicle of its class in the world, the iconic Saab Seaeye Falcon.

The exhibition is the first in Europe to offer an insight into the current state‐of‐art technology used in the oil, gas and wind energy sectors at sea, and provides a setting for innovative courses, research and education.

Visitors experience life on board an offshore platform and in the undersea world below, through exhibits, film and simulation.

click image to enlarge
The Undersea World Experience.  
The Undersea World Experience.
  click image to enlarge
Falcon on permanent display at the Offshore Experience Exhibition, Maritime Museum, Rotterdam.  
Falcon on permanent display at the
Offshore Experience Exhibition,
Maritime Museum, Rotterdam.

"Discovering how technology can master the most hostile environment on the planet is a valuable and inspiring experience," says Saab Seaeye's managing director, Jon Robertson.

"When we introduced the Falcon over 15 years ago its pioneering technology changed the industry and it is still our top selling system," he says. "This year its winning formula is further enhanced with our advanced iCON behaviour‐based intelligent control architecture."

click image to enlarge
Saab Seaeye Falcon The world's most successful underwater electric robotic vehicle of its class now boosted with the highly advanced iCON behaviour-based intelligent control architecture.
Saab Seaeye Falcon
The world's most successful underwater electric robotic vehicle of its class now boosted
with the highly advanced iCON behaviour-based intelligent control architecture.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


The Offshore Experience:

https://www.maritiemmuseum.nl/
exhibitions/offshore-experience


11 February 2017

FALCON EVEN SMARTER

click image to enlarge
Falcon - the world's most successful underwater electric robotic vehicle of its class now boosted with the highly advanced iCON behaviour-based intelligent control architecture.
Falcon ‐ the world's most
successful underwater electric
robotic vehicle of its class now
boosted with the highly advanced
iCON behaviour‐based intelligent
control architecture.

The winning formula of the Falcon ‐ the most successful underwater electric robotic vehicle of its class in the world ‐ has received a considerable boost.

Saab Seaeye has enhanced the Falcon's already smart intelligent control system with their advanced iCON behaviour-based intelligent control architecture.

It means the Falcon can now host many new features, making it an advanced platform for further automation and behaviour-based software development.

Station‐keeping and fine position adjustment is an important new attribute that reduces the operator's workload by allowing them to concentrate on the task at hand. Fitting a Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) and interface node has made this possible.

It is also now possible to add higher accuracy sensors for heading, depth and altitude.

The iCON enhancement is available on all new Falcons, or as an upgrade to existing vehicles. It comes as a new design surface control consul that incorporates the iCON software - already a feature of Saab Seaeye's successful Leopard work system.

The new control consul features a wide, high-resolution touchscreen monitor, customisable graphic user interface and an ability to record video and still images. It also offers user-friendly system configuration and diagnostic pages.

click image to enlarge
The new surface control consul incorporates Saab Seaeye's iCON behaviour-based intelligent control software.
The new surface control consul incorporates
Saab Seaeye's iCON behaviour-based intelligent control software.

iCON's building block simplicity is key to the company's ongoing success as it allows harmonious migration of technology throughout Saab Seaeye's range and is currently accelerating new systems development.

The Falcon's winning concept comes from a careful balance of five powerful thrusters and an intelligent distributed control system in a small, easily manhandled 1 x 0.5 x 0.6 metre size versatile chassis.

Its power and control make it highly manoeuvrable and able to master strong crosscurrents whilst undertaking precision tasks with steadiness and precise manoeuvrability.

Proven since introduced in 2002, the Falcon's pioneering distributed intelligence provides each device on the vehicle with its own microprocessor, thereby allowing tools and sensors to be easily added or changed, and custom options to be integrated - making it an ideal platform for numerous intricate and demanding applications.

Now the building block characteristic of iCON offers a ready platform for future enhancements to the Falcon range, which, coming in 300 and 1000 metre depth ratings and can undertake a vast range of widely varying tasks across all key market sectors.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company, with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid electric robotic systems, engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


14 January 2017

SAAB SEAEYE SEE AN ALL-ELECTRIC FUTURE

Electric robotic systems will perform all tasks in the underwater domain, including those now undertaken by hydraulic systems, says Saab Seaeye.

They see a future where ROVs and AUVs in their present form will cease to exist and are replaced by transformative e‐robotics that can roam, hover, reside and perform all underwater tasks.

It is a future where task resolution is key, not class of vehicle, says the company.

Such tasks will include the heaviest in the subsea industry, tasks that electric systems and tools on the market today cannot yet undertake, but where the company sees rapidly advancing technology, innovative design and operational methods opening up an all-electric underwater world.


. . . a future where task resolution is key

This will bring further significant savings, says director, Matt Bates, savings that are already here today as electric technologies bring considerable through‐life cost economies.

Electric is also more effective, he contends, as an all‐electric robotic system is up to 50% more efficient, and typically has double the power density of an electro-hydraulic system.

Miniaturisation

Rapid advances in miniaturisation ‐ a key benefit of electric technology ‐ are accelerating advances, says Matt Bates, and are creating electric robotic systems that are smaller, lighter, smarter, more agile and more powerful.

Electric actuators and tools have the added benefit of a simplified, reliable interface which, when complemented with an internal processor and suitable micro-sensors, extracts valuable data, enhances control options and increases total system reliability through continuous internal monitoring. Having more data available from a device assists with pre‐emptive maintenance planning and, coupled with an electric‐only interface, allows for more remote long‐term deployment underwater.

Lower costs

Matt Bates says technology breakthroughs are already bringing savings, with reductions in vehicle size, weight, cable diameters, winch size and other elements, leading to more compact systems that make considerable economies for operators.

He points to the Leopard work vehicle as an example of how technology breakthroughs are opening up a lower cost future.

Compared to a 60 ton hydraulic equivalent, the Leopard's 30 ton complete package has a much smaller footprint, faster mobilisation time, lower maintenance costs, and needs fewer staff at the worksite, Matt Bates says. In addition, the Leopard's unprecedented ratio of thrust to volume and speed through water provides the payload, power and control stability needed to carry the range of tooling and sensors usually associated with much larger systems.

Leopard - the most powerful electric work system of its size in the world Leopard - the most powerful electric work system of
its size in the world incorporates many of the features
that are shaping the future of transformative
underwater e‐robotics.

Transformation

A foretaste of transformative technology can be seen in the emergence of the hovering autonomous vehicle capable of being controlled remotely through low bandwidth links whilst accurately performing long excursion inspections, surveys and environmental monitoring tasks. An example is the Sabertooth which has merged AUV and ROV technology into a single system that can, through wireless communication, roam, hover and perform tetherless light intervention tasks such as valve operations with an integrated electric torque tool.

Sabertooth - pioneering transformative technology Sabertooth - pioneering transformative
technology that has created a system that
can roam autonomously, hover, perform light
tasks and remain resident.

Intelligent control

Common to the future of all robotic systems is intelligent, behaviour-based control systems architecture, such as the iCON system, which comprises a set of hardware and software building blocks that allow harmonious migration of concepts across different systems and accelerates future development innovation.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid robotic systems engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com


10 January 2017

STUDENTS FLY FALCON FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

click image to enlarge
Students with the Saab Seaeye Falcon on board research ship.
Students with the Saab Seaeye Falcon
on board research ship.


Students get hands-on experience operating a Saab Seaeye Falcon ROV in the Gulf of Maine on the eastern seaboard of the USA where they explore the undersea world and develop their environmental awareness.

The project brings students, scientists, teachers and marine professionals together and is run by OceansWide, a non-profit organisation, and is an outreach programme that supports the outreach requirements of the National Science Foundation and other granting agencies.

Young people are encouraged to participate in real life scientific research and write reports on their findings.

The activities are run both in class and on board OceansWide's research ship - from where the Falcon is deployed.


In addition to encouraging understanding through research, Buzz Scott, president of OceansWide, explains that the project aims to support industry and marine science by creating innovative programmes that use ROVs to inspire young people to expand their horizons and teach them about the world's oceans through first hand shipboard experience.

click image to enlarge
Students inside the research ship exploring the undersea world with the Falcon's live feed HD quality video.
Students inside the research ship exploring the undersea world
with the Falcon's live feed HD quality video.

Buzz Scott says they opted for the Falcon, "After a lot of research into the best robotic system and found the Falcon kept coming out top for the smaller research projects."

He says the Falcon allows them to dive deeper than any other small ROV and manoeuvres more efficiently, and has an overall better quality of video capture underwater.

"The controlled power of its five thrusters is so much better for precise manoeuvrability and holding steady in currents whilst filming, and the fibre system means we get HD quality video coming up the tether to the support vessel."

He concludes by extolling the value of undersea exploration for young people: "We like to get the kids involved no matter what their interests, because once you get them out on the water to see what's down there ‐ it's in a way like sailing with Jacques Cousteau or Bob Ballard ‐ you get the bug."

click image to enlarge
Preparing the Saab Seaeye Falcon for a dive.  
Preparing the Saab Seaeye Falcon for a dive.
  click image to enlarge
Research ship with the Saab Seaeye Falcon on board.  
Research ship with the
Saab Seaeye Falcon on board.

Saab Seaeye is the world's leading underwater e‐robotics company with the most advanced range of tethered, autonomous and hybrid robotic systems engineered to address the diverse range of tasks found across commercial, defence and scientific markets.

OceansWide is a non‐profit organisation that brings students and scientists together at sea in the Gulf of Maine. Our dedicated group of scientists, teachers and marine professionals work with students to determine research goals, participate in research and report on their findings ‐ all from the back deck of our research vessel.

For more information contact:

Matt Bates
Saab Seaeye Limited
+44 (0)1489 898 000

www.seaeye.com

Campbell "Buzz" Scott
OceansWide
+1 207 620 6037

www.orkneyrovspecialist.co.uk